Monday, February 16, 2009

Consumer Law Matters

The more things stay the same, the more they stay the same: A look at a 1981 WCA case.

When a car dealer charges you for unauthorized repairs, you don't have to pay... for now.


Arbitration provisions in consumer credit contracts are almost per se unenforceable... but...

Is it unconscionable to sue someone you don't think owes you money? Maybe not....

A fistfight leads to a knock-down, drag-out... discussion of consumer leases.

Can bloggers expect to get paid for contributing to a website?

VOID! Could a Wisconsin Consumer Act case allow courts to invalidate mortgages? Maybe.

Back in the day, we didn't sue immediately, but waited a decent amount of time: The first ever WCA case involved an illegal repossession.

Blogger sued for $60,000 for interference with contract.

A follow up on the Credit CARD act proves I was right. (Most things that happen prove I was right.)

Suing an all you can eat restaurant, when you didn't eat all they let you eat, might be tricky.

A dog-bite cases brings up issues of public policies... and also issues of dog bites.

A lawsuit I disagree with? (NFL Fans sue over Super Bowl, and why they shouldn't.)

The case of the too-pink salmon: How you can sue a fast food restaurant for fake food.

Computers are the litigants of the future: a credit card collection case helps clarify Palisades.

Suing your lawyer? Spell it all out in the complaint. Oh, and be innocent, too.

"Robots" text from five years ago might be worth $200 to you.

Your ex-roommate can send you to jail over stuff left behind.

That vacation isn't going to be as easy to take as you thought: Is a wave of lawsuits against gold buyers pending?

Seal poets unite! Can you sue an internet search engine for links to your name?

A lawyer's agreement spawns many questions, none of them get answers in the opinion. (Lawyer cannot agree to arbitration without authorization.)


Action at a distance: what other parties in the case do can affect you, so pay attention.

New credit card rules that may help consumers (but probably not.)

Do For-Profit schools rip off their students?
Follow up: Lawsuit in Wisconsin alleging fraud by online school.

Don't call a newspaper, call a lawyer.

New debit card rules prohibit overdraft fees in some circumstances.

The Wisconsin State Journal might have cost this woman $2400. (Consumer Approval Transactions have special rules, you know.)

Wisconsin WAMU customers may have unclaimed money waiting for them.

Wisconsin DOJ sues Verizon over allegedly improper billing.

Adventures in Arbitration: A New Consumer Act Case Reaches What Is Getting To Be An Old Result.

Can I at least sue Brett Favre for throwing that pass on 3rd down? (Ticketholders can't sue sports teams for not following the rules.)

You need a lawyer: When a malpractice claim begins to accrue.


A couple of Latin phrases, etc. (The doctrines of respondeat superior, in pari delicto, and you.)

You're about to get taken advantage of... for the second time. (A class action against Associated Bank raises some questions.)

You've got 8 years to spend that gift card, at least in Wisconsin.

Can you UNcause something? (Examining a legal malpractice case.)

Lifelock agrees to pay for not doing what it advertised. (But you won't get any money from the settlement.)

Be careful what you wish for... (Too-high offers reduce attorney's fee awards.)

Getting a case dismissed means you've won (Consumers can get fees and costs for getting a complaint dismissed, even temporarily.)

Is your case really frivolous? (Frivolous claims should be rare in Wisconsin, given the Rabideau case.)

Bill Me Later, Sue Me Now? (An internet button gets clicked by a lawsuit.)

Someone's in the kitchen with Dinah (The need for expert witnesses to tell what things cost.)

Watch what your employees are saying (The Doctrine of Apparent Authority, briefly explained.)

Make $25,000 by knowing who your doctor's talking to. (Wisconsin protects medical records' confidentiality.)

This is why I cut my own hair (Can you sue your barber? Sure!)

Get a lawyer? OK, I will! (A landlord-tenant dispute nets some tenants $119,000+).

Don't forget to tip your debt collector. (Cell phone contracts allow debt collectors to charge you?)

When Banks Screw Up: The Strange, Alarming, Sad, and Ultimately Wonderful Case Of Dorothy Chase Stewart.
Part One: Late fees and suspense accounts.

Part Two: Inspection notices and price opinions.

Part Three: The happy ending? And more problems.


Sharks Can Swim On Land, Too: Why it's a bad idea to sell your land to your lawyer.

By Reading This Headline... (Are contracts as binding as we think they are? It all depends.)

What is the sound of one law clapping? (Do creditors even need to comply with Wisconsin law anymore?)

George Costanza: Consumer Protection Pioneer?
(Mechanics have to get authority to do repairs -- or you may not have to pay.)

Lawsuits & Loose Cannons:
How defending your house can get you sued.

Clark Howard Was Wrong! Why hiring a lawyer is better than calling a free radio show.

Time Is An Illusion, Lunchtime Doubly So: A rundown of some of the various time limits in the law.

So the Rule Is, Don't Read Bank Contracts, Do Read Receipts? Get up to $1,000 for a company's printing error...

Get ripped off by a balloon company, or other company? Here's what you can do.

There's no business like snow business: Some rules for home-improvement contracts.

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